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cross-connect:

NeSpoon is a street artist from Warsaw, Poland. Her artistic focus is on the intricate patterns of lace, and breaking its granny stereotype by using it to beautify gritty urban spaces. NeSpoon calls her artistic approach the “jewellery of the public space”:

Jewellery makes people look pretty, my public jewellery has the same goal, make public places look better.

NeSpoon often uses the usual spray paint and stencils of enlarged lace patterns to produce her works on the street via

artist find at Lustik

(via aiglet12)

Tags: art
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jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

(via aiglet12)

Tags: people
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oatmeal:

Bonus panel here.  Read more comics here.

Ladies taking care of ladies.

Tags: comics
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zerostatereflex:

Tangible Media

MIT’s Tangible Media is coming along nicely,

"Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that’s only the beginning."

(via bornofanatombomb)

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escapekit:

One Day

a unique series of landscapes in which Japanese photographer Ken Kitano uses long exposures to capture sunrise to sunset throughout the course of one single day. 

(Source: mymodernmet.com)

Tags: photography
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dailyoverview:

7/4/2014
Statue of Liberty
New York City, New York, USA
40°41′21″N 74°2′40″W

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The robed female figure bears a torch and a tablet that is inscribed with the date of the American Declaration of Independence - July 4, 1776. Happy 4th of July from Daily Overview!

www.overv.eu

dailyoverview:

7/4/2014

Statue of Liberty

New York City, New York, USA

40°41′21″N 74°2′40″W

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The robed female figure bears a torch and a tablet that is inscribed with the date of the American Declaration of Independence - July 4, 1776. Happy 4th of July from Daily Overview!

www.overv.eu

Tags: photography
Link

foodisthenewrock:

"Colin Meloy’s Home Brewing Experiment #6: Colin upped the water temperature a few degrees and is pretty sure he added the hops at the right time for this batch, so we’ll see what that did for it."

::dying:: Send help.

Tags: beer hilarity
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just-a-muse:

siphersaysstuff:

therobotmonster:

moniquill:

siderealsandman:

friendlytroll:

astrakiseki:

prokopetz:

mikhailvladimirovich:

bogleech:

It’s funny how science fiction universes so often treat humans as a boring, default everyman…

Text

firstdayofspring321 said: Hi there -- The rough inspiration for our wedding theme is The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe (specifically chapter 11). I'd love to use the same typeface for our invites (and save-the-dates, and everything else) as was used in the books I had growing up, but have no idea where to find it. Paperback, published 1950, illustrations by Pauline Baynes. This has been a long shot and may not work out, but I thought I'd ask. Thanks for any help you can give.

fuckyeahbookarts:

Hi there, while I don’t know the exact typeface off the top of my noggin (and have totally lost track of my childhood copy of the book!) you can always try using ‘What the Font!’.

All you need to do is take a clear picture of the specific text and upload it to the website, where it will do its best to detect the name of the typeface! Good luck and congratulations on your big day :)

Hi @firstdayofspring321! If you’re talking about this Collier Books edition (the one I grew up with!), then the body type is set in something very close to Eric Gill’s Perpetua. (It doesn’t seem to be an exact match, but it’s so close it might even be just a difference between metal and digital iterations of the font.) For those editions, the cover font is Herb Lubalin’s ITC Serif Gothic, and it uses ITC Kabel for some of the interior display titles.

If you’re talking about an earlier edition, with the original Pauline Baynes cover art, then that titling looks like it’s set in Perpetua so it might be a good bet that the body type is too.

I hope this helps!

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austinkleon:


robertogreco:

Our Education, Austin Kleon, 2014

Always honored to get a blog from someone I follow.
I don’t usually post these to this tumblr, although, maybe I should. I post a new blackout every day on Instagram→

austinkleon:

robertogreco:

Our Education, Austin Kleon, 2014

Always honored to get a blog from someone I follow.

I don’t usually post these to this tumblr, although, maybe I should. I post a new blackout every day on Instagram→

Tags: quote