Photoset

archatlas:

Katherine Baxter

"Katherine Baxter’s work is exquisite, whether small or large scale. Meticulous research goes into every ‘jewel’ like piece, and the pleasure she derives from producing these, is communicated to us all. There is complete mastery of the axonometric projection, as can be appreciated in her grand London and New York posters. It is, as if one is transported by hot air balloon, floating gently over all those much loved and beautifully painted landmarks.” David Driver Head of design, The Times

(via 99percentinvisible)

Tags: city maps
Photoset

shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 

Rest In Peace…

to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.

And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 

(via zephrene)

Photo
typeworship:

Doorway to type nirvana?
I love this close up of a mural by Colossal Media, in Williamsburg, New York. The sign painters are well-known for their enormous outdoor murals, art projects and advertising images. Always hand-painted and often hundreds of feet off of the ground.
This is photo is from their Big Brush Project, a public art initiative showcasing their work. It was produced in collaboration with NYC-based lettering artist Greg Lamarche and reads Sky High Murals.

“Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.”

typeworship:

Doorway to type nirvana?

I love this close up of a mural by Colossal Media, in Williamsburg, New York. The sign painters are well-known for their enormous outdoor murals, art projects and advertising images. Always hand-painted and often hundreds of feet off of the ground.

This is photo is from their Big Brush Project, a public art initiative showcasing their work. It was produced in collaboration with NYC-based lettering artist Greg Lamarche and reads Sky High Murals.

“Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.”

(Source: instagram.com)

Video

All you fascists are bound to lose. Yes sir.

(Source: Spotify)

Tags: music spotify
Video

caledscratch:

roarkshop:

I watched this 4 minute video about how reintroducing wolves to Yellowstone park literally changed everything about the park and just sat there for another two minutes, mouth open and teary eyed and amazed. Definitely worth a watch. 

it’s amazing how the earth itself changed in response to wildlife…

(via aiglet12)

Quote
"

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

"

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. (via bakcwadrs)

a couple of other quotes from the article i really like:

According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace

and

Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time.

(via mercy-misrule)

This. Everything about this.

(via zephrene)

Photoset

aethelflaed:

archiemcphee:

Norwegian artist Markus Moestue transformed three humble bicycles into this ferociously awesome Dinocycle. The dinosaur’s body, which is modeled after a Coelophysis, was carved out of polystyrene and coated in fiberglass. After completing his creation, Moestue took his creature for a ride around southern Norway.

According to VG News the raptor bicycle is now up for sale. The bids immediately began rolling in, however Moestue isn’t really concerned with how much money people are wiling to offer. He’s much more interested in finding someone who wants to do something particularly interesting with this wonderfully unusual bike.

[via Geekologie]

I would totally ride this to work.

Photo
dailyoverview:

Flying into NYC, @nycgraeme captured this incredible overview of Manhattan. We really appreciate all the Overview submissions we’ve received so far. Thanks for your support!

dailyoverview:

Flying into NYC, @nycgraeme captured this incredible overview of Manhattan. We really appreciate all the Overview submissions we’ve received so far. Thanks for your support!

Photo
aethelflaed:

hollyhocksandtulips:

Underoos, 1981

I miss these.

aethelflaed:

hollyhocksandtulips:

Underoos, 1981

I miss these.

Quote
"Outside views are often badges of seniority or achievement in the work world… But new evidence suggests employers should look at daylight exposure less as a mark of accomplishment and more as a matter of public health. So says an interdisciplinary team of architects and medical researchers that recently conducted a small case study comparing people exposed to natural light at their jobs with those who aren’t. The window workers scored better on common self-report health and sleep surveys; they also slept 46 minutes more a night, on average, as measured by a sleep monitor."

Researchers find that windowless offices make workers lose sleep at night – which makes sense given how important daylight exposure is to regulating our internal clocks

Ongoing coverage of sleep here.

(via explore-blog)

This is incredibly important. In NYC’s huge block-wide office buildings, window access is sadly limited, and office architecture’s habit of giving windows to conference rooms that are often only occupied a fraction of each day instead of to workers is a bad one. I’m grateful every day for the window beside my desk —I’m very aware of how enormously it affects my attitude and mental health (and keeps fluorescent-light-induced migraines at bay), as well as physical health apparently — and one of my greatest workplace fears is losing it.

(via 99percentinvisible)